Money Management

Read Ecclesiastes 2:12-23

I hated all the things I had toiled for under the sun, because I must leave them to the one who comes after me. And who knows whether he will be a wise man or a fool? Ecclesiastes 2:18-19

Solomon was born wealthy, and great wealth came to him because he was the king. But he was looking at life "under the sun" and speaking for the common people who were listening to his discussion. The day would come when Solomon would die and leave everything to his successor. This reminds us of our Lord's warning in the parable of the rich fool (Luke 12:13-21) and Paul's words in 1 Timothy 6:7-10. A Jewish proverb says, "There are no pockets in shrouds."

Money is a medium of exchange. Unless it is spent, it can do little or nothing for us. We can't eat money, but we can use it to buy food. It will not keep us warm, but it will purchase fuel for that purpose. A writer in the Wall Street Journal called money an article that may be used as a universal passport to everywhere except heaven and as a universal provider of everything except happiness.

Of course, you and I are stewards of our wealth; God is the Provider (Deut. 8:18) and the Owner, and we have the privilege of enjoying it and using it for His glory. One day we will have to give an account of what we have done with His generous gifts. While we cannot take wealth with us when we die, we can send it ahead as we use it today according to God's will (Matt. 6:19-34; 1 Tim. 6:17-19).

Applying God's Truth:

1. To what extent would you say you are concerned about leaving a good inheritance for your children? Do you wonder if they will appreciate it as they should?
2. What is your philosophy of money? How much importance do you think it deserves?
3. What does it mean to you to be a steward of your wealth?

Devotions for Contentment and Wisdom ©2005 by Dr. Warren Wiersbe. Used by permission of David C Cook. May not be further reproduced. All rights reserved.

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